CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

CAS applies AI-driven approach in collaboration with INPI Brazil to transform patent examinations

CAS | March 22, 2022

CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, recently completed a major project with The National Institute of Industrial Property of Brazil to implement an enhanced examination workflow solution for chemistry patent applications using a unique blend of technology, artificial intelligence, data, and expertise. The new solution reduced application examination times by up to 50%, helping the office achieve their goal of clearing 80% of their multi-year application backlog.

"Overcoming delays in the patent cycle has a significant, positive impact on innovation and economic growth in Brazil. Quickly granting patent rights accelerates investment, because applicants are confident their products will not be copied, which is the inventor's greatest fear. A structured, predictable and strong IP ecosystem helps ensure investment,"

Gabriel Di Blasi, Founding Partner, Di Blasi, Parente & Associates, of Rio de Janeiro

Brazil's rapid growth caused patent application volume to outpace the patent office's examination capacity. The new, optimized examination workflow uses CAS's AI technology and eliminates a significant number of examiner search steps, allowing the office to better keep pace with projected application volumes.

"The challenges faced by INPI Brazil reflect the unprecedented demands on patent offices around the world. As the largest economy in Latin America, the imperative to improve patent pendency was clear," said CAS President Manuel Guzman. "We are proud of the meaningful impact our work with INPI has already achieved and believe this solution provides an excellent starting point to help other patent offices optimize resources and ensure sustainable growth."

CAS worked with INPI Brazil to tailor a solution to their unique needs. By employing multiple AI algorithms trained with patent office data and the scientist-curated CAS Content Collection™, the approach meaningfully increased examiner productivity. INPI Brazil reported that the CAS solution significantly reduced examiner search times for 77% of national applications processed, and that 29% of national applications processed required little or no additional search.

"Our solution is designed to transform the prior art search process. Chemistry patent applications are very complex, requiring searches of both text and chemical structures within patent and non-patent publications. This is a unique capability of the CAS-designed solution," said CAS Chief Product Officer Tim Wahlberg.

Spotlight

Inside this fire lighting kit was the chemicals "glycerin" and "potassium permanganate". When mixed together then these two chemicals do ignite and start a fire. Here is the instruction video that Chavy Dave put together for Fox Recon viewers and my-self with regards to using glycerin & potassium permanganate together in order to start a fire. Disclaimer: Remember that this stuff can be very dangerous so don't try this at home ( for real don't try it at home ).NB: Just an update people then, Fox Recon™ has NO CONNECTION with any Air Soft Companies. It's been bought to my attention that an Air Soft Company may be using the Fox Recon name.


Other News
CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

New Association of Plastic Recyclers State-of-the-Industry Report Shows Strength of US Plastic Recycling

Association of Plastic Recyclers | August 12, 2022

The Association of Plastic Recyclers The Voice of Plastic Recycling®, issued a report that provides a data-driven update on the progress of plastic recycling in the United States showing that it is a viable, accessible and scalable solution for reducing plastic waste. The report compiles research and analysis from across the $236 billion recycling industry which includes over 9,000 community recycling programs across the country and more than 100 post-consumer recyclers. The report finds that plastic recycling alone is responsible for over 200,000 U.S. jobs. “APR’s state-of-the-industry report tells the true story of plastic recycling in the United States. This is an industry that processed almost five billion pounds of post-consumer plastic material in 2020 despite a pandemic and related lockdown, and we have every expectation that number will continue to grow.” Steve Alexander, President and CEO of the Association of Plastic Recyclers The report presents an important clarification on data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the discussion on US recycling rates. The report explains that 80% of rigid plastic packaging is polyethylene terephthalate (PET), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP). These are the types of plastic packaging (such as soda bottles, laundry detergent jugs, and yogurt tubs) that are most used by businesses and available to consumers to put in their blue bins. The report found that 21% of these types of plastic, the type that U.S. consumers touch every day, are recycled based on EPA data. The report also includes the latest data for PET and HDPE bottles alone - a current recycling rate of 28%. With more supply of recyclable plastic material from consumers, U.S. plastic recyclers could boost PET and HDPE bottle recycling rate – raising the rate to over 40% – with minimal additional investment and using existing processing infrastructure in the U.S. “Increasing the recycling rate is important because demand for recycled material, a key driver of the recycling chain, is stronger than ever, spurred by a variety of factors including brand sustainability commitments and legislative activity,” added Alexander. The report concludes that meeting that high demand and continuing to sustain and grow recycling will require three steps: (1) companies to manufacture plastic products and packaging that are compatible with recycling, (2) consumers to put recyclable material in the bin and (3) a robust recycling infrastructure to collect, sort and process that material. The report provides policy recommendations including: ensure that all new products and packaging are made to be compatible with recycling; increase and strengthen community recycling programs and create harmonization among the types of plastic that are collected in those programs; and encourage the consideration of the true cost of disposal and the low costs to landfill. “This report shows that, while there is still work to be done, plastic recycling can succeed,” Alexander added. “Consumers want recycling to work, and recyclers are ready to process more material. Our industry is innovative and resilient. It is time to recommit to plastic recycling for our communities, for our environment, and for our future.” As the international trade association representing the plastics recycling industry, APR membership includes independent recycling companies of all sizes, processing numerous resins, as well as consumer product companies, equipment manufacturers, testing laboratories, organizations, and others committed to the success of plastics recycling. APR advocates the recycling of all plastics. Visit www.PlasticsRecyling.org for more information.

Read More

CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

Polymers Made from Emissions: The Plastics Industry May Become a Carbon-Capture Leader, says IDTechEx

IDTechEx | July 06, 2022

One of the major environmental issues facing the planet is the rising levels of plastic consumption and waste. According to a recent OECD study, the world produced 460 million tonnes (Mt) of plastics in 2019 and consumption will continue to rise despite an expected increase in recycling technologies deployment. As carbon dioxide emissions also soar, the emerging carbon capture and utilization industry propose a solution for both issues: creating lower-carbon, degradable polymers using CO2 emissions as the feedstock. The recent IDTechEx report "Carbon Dioxide Utilization 2022-2042: Technologies, Market Forecasts, and Players" analyzes the opportunities and challenges of creating this proposed circular carbon economy. How to make polymers from CO2? There are at least three major pathways to convert CO2 into polymers: electrochemistry, biological conversion, and thermocatalysis. The latter is the most mature CO2 utilization technology, where CO2 can either be utilized directly to yield CO2-based polymers, most notably biodegradable linear-chain polycarbonates (LPCs), or indirectly, through the production of chemical precursors (building blocks such as methanol, ethanol, acrylate derivatives, or mono-ethylene glycol [MEG]) for polymerization reactions. LPCs made from CO2 include polypropylene carbonate polyethylene carbonate and polyurethanes PUR being a major market for CO2-based polymers, with applications in electronics, mulch films, foams, and in the biomedical and healthcare sectors. CO2 can comprise up to 50% (in weight) of a polyol, one of the main components in PUR. CO2-derived polyols are made by combining CO2 with cyclic ethers The polyol is then combined with an isocyanate component to make PUR. Companies such as Econic, Covestro, and Aramco Performance Materials have developed novel catalysts to facilitate CO2-based polyol manufacturing. Fossil inputs are still necessary through this thermochemical pathway, but manufacturers can replace part of it with waste CO2, potentially saving on raw material costs. In the realm of emerging technologies, chemical precursors for CO2-based polymers can be obtained through electrochemistry or microbial synthesis. Although electrochemical conversion of CO2 into chemicals is at an earlier stage of development, biological pathways are more mature, having reached the early-commercialization stage. Recent advances in genetic engineering and process optimization have led to the use of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in synthetic biological routes to convert CO2 into chemicals, fuels, and even proteins. Unlike thermochemical synthesis, these biological pathways generally use conditions approaching ambient temperature and pressure, with the potential to be less energy-intensive and costly at scale. Notably, the California-based start-up Newlight is bringing into market a direct biological route to polymers, where its microbe turns captured CO2, air, and methane into polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), an enzymatically degradable polymer. Currently, the scale of CO2-based polymer manufacturing is still minor compared to the incumbent petrochemical industry, but there are already successful commercial examples. One of the largest volumes available is aromatic polycarbonates (PC) made from CO2, being developed by Asahi Kasei in Taiwan since 2012. More recently, the US-based company LanzaTech has successfully established partnerships with major brands such as Unilever, L'Oréal, On, Danone, Zara, and Lulumelon to use microbes to convert captured carbon emissions from industrial processes into polymer precursors – ethanol and MEG – for manufacturing of packaging items, shoes, and textiles. About IDTechEx IDTechEx guides your strategic business decisions through its Research, Subscription and Consultancy products, helping you profit from emerging technologies.

Read More

CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

The Recycling Partnership’s Polypropylene Recycling Coalition Celebrates “Widely Recycled” Upgrade

The Recycling Partnership | July 29, 2022

The Recycling Partnership’s Polypropylene Recycling Coalition is celebrating the How2Recycle upgrade of polypropylene rigid containers to “Widely Recycled” in the U.S. This major milestone comes as the Coalition marks its two-year anniversary. Launched in July 2020, the Coalition brings together stakeholders across the PP value chain – from resin suppliers and manufacturers to consumer packaged goods, and recycling processors – to improve PP recovery and recycling in the U.S. and to further develop end markets for recycling PP. In the two years since the launch of the Coalition, its catalytic grants have proven highly successful at rapidly impacting the recycling system. The Coalition has awarded 24 grants totaling $6.7 million, including four grants that will be announced in August, to support sorting improvements and community education across the U.S. As a result, curbside access to PP recycling will improve for approximately 8% of households, positively affecting over 20 million people and increasing the amount of PP recovered by an estimated 25 million pounds annually for established domestic end markets. The speed at which the Coalition has been able to drive impact is attributable to the commitment of its members and the strong desire of materials recovery facilities (MRFs) to collect and sort this valuable commodity. “Achieving success for challenged materials is not a narrative often heard in our industry. It was a mere two years ago when we acknowledged the challenges polypropylene recycling was facing and its uncertain future. In forming the Polypropylene Recycling Coalition, we committed to leaning in and taking action in support of the material, to push ourselves and the industry to a more circular future. The power of collaboration across the value chain can be seen through this substantial system-wide shift for polypropylene. The precedent we are setting for materials, coalitions, and innovations is exciting and hopeful. We encourage companies to join us as we continue to push polypropylene recycling to new heights.” Keefe Harrison, CEO of The Recycling Partnership In assessing the potential for the Coalition’s efforts to support an upgrade of PP to “Widely Recycled” under the How2Recycle program, the Coalition and How2Recycle teams worked closely together over the course of many months. Updated inputs were evaluated for the access and end markets criteria that originally led to PP being downgraded to “Check Locally” in January 2020. Using the Sustainable Packaging Coalition’s 2020/2021 Centralized Study on Availability of Recycling for a prior baseline where PP rigid containers were reported as having a 59% access rate, the teams leveraged The Partnership’s National Recycling Database to evaluate the current U.S. access rate, which is now 65%. To evaluate the current state of end markets, the teams utilized The Partnership’s Circular Packaging Assessment tool to confirm the growth and strength of domestic end markets for PP. The teams saw improvements in these two areas as largely attributable to the catalytic work of the Coalition, as well as industry investment and increased recognition of the value of PP as a recycled commodity. “The efforts of the Polypropylene Recycling Coalition are a great example of the impact that can be made with collective action focused on supporting the full recycling system and we are honored to have been in an advisory role since its inception,” said Caroline Cox, Director of How2Recycle. “As rigid polypropylene access, sortation, and end markets are on an upward trend across the U.S., we are excited to upgrade this packaging format from Check Locally to Widely Recycled eligibility. Thanks to the strength and efficacy of the data provided, How2Recycle is confident that this change in eligibility continues to be in line with federal law. While this win should be recognized, it is important to note that this is not the end of the road; the entire value chain should continue to invest in improving the recyclability of all materials and packaging formats.” The Coalition is celebrating this significant impact – made in only two years – while recognizing that the work to support PP recycling must go further. The Coalition will continue to lead efforts to increase curbside access to PP recycling, support sortation equipment upgrades, as well as ensure PP domestic end markets continue to grow. The mission-driven work of the Coalition is supported by contributions from organizations representing all segments of the material’s value chain. Members include Keurig Dr Pepper, Braskem, The NextGen Consortium, the Walmart Foundation, Advanced Drainage Systems, AMP Robotics, Berry Global, Campbell Soup Company, EFS-plastics, Ferrero, The Kroger Co. Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Foundation, KW Plastics, LyondellBasell, Merlin Plastics, Milliken & Company, Nestlé, Plastic Ingenuity, PolyQuest, Procter & Gamble, Sabert, St. Joseph Plastics, Total Energies, and Winpak. The Coalition is advised by industry leaders including, Association of Plastic Recyclers, Sustainable Packaging Coalition, World Wildlife Fund, Closed Loop Partners, and Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners. All companies that use polypropylene are encouraged to become part of the solution to ensure greater and better capture of this valuable material. To learn more about the Coalition and how to get involved in supporting its goals, visit the Polypropylene Recycling Coalition webpage. For MRFs interested in applying for a grant, the application is available on the Coalition webpage. About The Recycling Partnership At The Recycling Partnership, we are solving for circularity. We mobilize people, data, and solutions across the value chain to unlock the environmental and economic benefits of recycling and a circular economy. We work on the ground with thousands of communities to transform

Read More

CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

RELEX Solutions Becomes Carbon Neutral

RELEX Solutions | June 10, 2022

RELEX Solutions, provider of AI-driven supply chain and retail planning solutions, announced today that they have retroactively achieved carbon neutrality for 2021 and begun compensating annually for their emissions. RELEX partnered with offsetting provider Compensate to calculate and offset their carbon footprint. In practice, this means the company successfully removed or avoided 2,544 tonnes of CO2 emissions. RELEX reached the milestone through investments in two initiatives: afforestation in Qianbei, China, where 47,061 hectares of barren land are being converted into a forest, and the Luangwa Community Forests Project in Zambia, which improves local communities and protects 1 million hectares of wilderness areas. RELEX and Compensate calculated the solution provider’s carbon footprint across scopes 1, 2 and 3, addressing both direct and indirect emissions. The approach allowed RELEX to gain a holistic view of their carbon output, helping the company to innovate, execute, and track new ways to reduce emissions from all three scopes. “Solving the carbon emissions challenge first requires understanding its scope, so our priority was to gain visibility into how our operations impacted the environment, then counteract those impacts successfully. Reducing and offsetting carbon emissions is everyone’s responsibility – whether you’re a manufacturer, distributor, retailer, or solution provider, it’s important to scrutinize your footprint and take meaningful steps to address it.” Svante Göthe, Head of Sustainability at RELEX These global carbon offset projects are in addition to strategies RELEX has already put in place to reduce their emissions. Flexible work-from-home policies, reducing non-essential business travel, successful remote implementations, and maximizing renewable energy coverage in RELEX’s cloud computing are a few examples of current initiatives that will continue to evolve. “At RELEX, we pride ourselves on how our technology helps retailers, wholesalers, and consumer packaged goods companies become more sustainable, helping customers cut food waste by up to 40%. That’s why it’s even more important that we practice what we preach, both in the long term through emissions reduction, and the short term through emissions offsetting,” says Mikko Kärkkäinen, Co-Founder and Group CEO at RELEX. “We’re proud to support programs such as the Qianbei and Luangwa projects that will have tangible, positive impacts on their regions for years to come.” About RELEX Solutions RELEX Solutions helps retailers and consumer brands drive profitable growth across all sales and distribution channels by maximizing customer satisfaction and minimizing operative costs. Our market-leading, unified supply chain and retail planning platform helps retailers and consumer goods companies align and optimize demand, merchandising, supply chain, and operations planning across the end-to-end value chain. We drive record-high product availability, increased sales, improved sustainability, and the best return on investment in inventory, space, workforce, and capacity. Leading brands like Dollar Tree and Family Dollar, Stokke, Rite Aid, Sprouts Farmers Market, AutoZone, and PetSmart trust RELEX to optimize their supply chain and retail planning. About Compensate Compensate combats climate change by offering everyone easy access to carbon capture. To achieve this mission, Compensate combines a market-disrupting sustainability approach with scalable software solutions.

Read More

Spotlight

Inside this fire lighting kit was the chemicals "glycerin" and "potassium permanganate". When mixed together then these two chemicals do ignite and start a fire. Here is the instruction video that Chavy Dave put together for Fox Recon viewers and my-self with regards to using glycerin & potassium permanganate together in order to start a fire. Disclaimer: Remember that this stuff can be very dangerous so don't try this at home ( for real don't try it at home ).NB: Just an update people then, Fox Recon™ has NO CONNECTION with any Air Soft Companies. It's been bought to my attention that an Air Soft Company may be using the Fox Recon name.

Resources