Biodegradable Plastic Is As Bad As Conventional Plastic: Research

fossbytes | April 30, 2019

Biodegradable plastic bags can survive up to 3 years in soil and water, according to a study. Biodegradable bags used in the experiment were able to carry groceries and other heavy items similar to a new plastic bag.By design, biodegradable plastic should be environmentally friendly and finish itself off after a certain amount of time. However, it remained intact even after continuous exposure to natural elements. The study was conducted by the University of Plymouth International Marine Litter Unit. Researchers at the institute used a compostable bag, two types of biodegradable bags and a conventional bag and exposed them to air, dirt and marine water. The idea was to stimulate the process of breakdown in all these bags and compare the actual rate of degradation. By definition, biodegradable plastic bags should decompose easily when left undisturbed in the environment for several months. However, it didn’t.The compostable retained its shape but wasn’t able to carry groceries due to the breakdown of its molecules. The conventional plastic bag remained as it is. This new study has reignited the debate around the effectiveness of “biodegradable plastic.” They obviously cost more and, as this study proves, are still not as effective when compared with conventional plastic.

Spotlight

oday we will conduct a very interesting chemical experiment, which is called a barking dog.
I’ll start with a big warning - this experiment has been done by professionals and its repetition without the knowledge of safety and any other necessary knowledge can lead to various unpleasant consequences which we all would like to avoid.

Spotlight

oday we will conduct a very interesting chemical experiment, which is called a barking dog.
I’ll start with a big warning - this experiment has been done by professionals and its repetition without the knowledge of safety and any other necessary knowledge can lead to various unpleasant consequences which we all would like to avoid.

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UL Collaborates with Agilis to Simplify Chemical Material and Ingredient Sourcing

UL | September 23, 2020

UL, a leading safety science company, announced today a collaboration with Agilis Chemicals. The collaboration leverages UL Prospector®, a leading search engine for chemical materials and ingredients and Agilis' e-commerce technology expertise in the chemical industry, to offer purchase and fulfillment solutions to Prospector users. Formulators and engineers who rely on Prospector for material and ingredient research and selection can now initiate material purchasing while on Prospector. Additionally, over 4,500 suppliers on Prospector can now build branded e-commerce portals with Agilis and link them with Prospector to offer end users an easy, convenient and secure way to buy their products. This will allow suppliers to more easily reach purchase-ready material buyers. Producers can also enroll their distributors and third-party logistics (3PL) providers for seamless order fulfillment.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

RiverCell Consortium announces Successful Demonstration of Advent Serene Fuel Cells to the Maritime Sector

Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. | December 21, 2021

Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. announced that its fuel cell unit for the Maritime Sector – developed within the frame of the RiverCell Consortium – has passed safety testing, as well as a safety assessment completed by DNV, one of the world's leading classification societies. RiverCell, a demonstration project supported by a consortium of partners, was initiated in 2015 and is expected to be completed by the end of this year. Funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry for Digital and Transport and led by Meyer Werft, it consists of a range of experienced partners throughout the maritime sector, including DNV, HADAG, Helm Proman Methanol, Neptun Werft, Pella Sietas, Technische Universität Berlin, Viking River Technical Cruises, and Advent. The project is dedicated to the design and development of a fuel cell hybrid system for inland vessels, and its realization has provided valuable insights in terms of the suitability, practical use, and economic efficiency of hybrid powertrains. In addition to cutting greenhouse gas emissions, the hybrid concept – featuring energy storage combined with sustainable fuel cell-powered energy production – demonstrated an increase to both safety and efficiency in shipping. As part of the demonstration, a section of a river cruise vessel was set up on dryland at Neptun Werft, in Rostock, Germany. There, the prototype of Advent’s Serene marine fuel cell unit was successfully integrated into a modern hybrid DC electric energy grid, which was equipped with all relevant ship systems, including battery storage as well as a conventional diesel genset. With current regulations still based on the traditional use of diesel-powered energy sources, another core objective of the demonstrations has been to encourage the development of new global regulatory frameworks for the shipping sector, thus paving the way for future use of sustainable technologies. “The maritime industry needs to find new ways to reduce all its emissions. Not only in the long run, but starting immediately, the shipping industry needs to deploy sustainable technologies and in particular speed up the change to renewable fuel sources. By RiverCell, we have demonstrated how fuel cell technology can be a safe, clean and efficient alternative to today’s diesel gensets in marine use. We have also been able to demonstrate how hydrogen for fuel cells, in the form of methanol, can be safely and efficiently stored on ships. The HT PEM fuel cells developed and manufactured by Advent Technologies can use methanol, carrier of hydrogen, as the fuel source, and we consider methanol one of the most promising and practical future fuels for the shipping sector. At Meyer Werft, we are happy to pioneer alongside our partners with our demonstrations of fuel cell technology, both to gain a competitive edge but also to influence global standards, paving the way for this sustainable alternative.” Commenting on the project, RiverCell’s Project Manager, Ragnar Christenson from Meyer Werft Advent’s Senior Vice President, Morten Hougaard Sørensen, similarly highlighted the importance of the project and its potential influence on future standards: “Fuel cell technologies to replace diesel gensets for inland and sea-going vessels will significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Using methanol produced from natural gas offers reduction of local pollution, and methanol produced from renewable sources can substantially contribute to reducing GHG emissions from shipping. In recent years, interest in methanol as a fuel for the shipping industry has grown significantly, but the industry is also waiting for the final regulatory frameworks to come into place before committing to large-scale investments. Now, with our prototype design of the marine fuel cell unit successfully passing its safety testing, and the safety assessment successfully completed with DNV, we hope to see this data included alongside equivalent standards using the technology, so the industry understands that fuel cells are both efficient, safe, and practical in use. And on that basis, we look forward to continuing our journey with Meyer Werft and lots of new customers in the industry. At Advent, we believe that only together can we build a better future”. About Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. Advent Technologies Holdings, Inc. is a U.S. corporation that develops, manufactures, and assembles complete fuel cell systems, and the critical components for fuel cells in the renewable energy sector. Advent is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, with offices in California, Greece, Denmark, Germany, and the Philippines. With more than 100 patents issued for its fuel cell technology, Advent holds the IP for next-generation HT-PEM that enable various fuels to function at high temperatures under extreme conditions – offering a flexible “Any Fuel. Anywhere.” option for the automotive, aviation, defense, oil and gas, marine, and power generation sectors.

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In the Ohio River Valley, with the pandemic’s help, the petrochemical boom is on hold

Stateimpact | September 21, 2020

At a marina in Moundsville, West Virginia, Dan Williamson looked out across the Ohio River at a quiet stretch of land on the other side. “There’s a little activity going on,” said Williamson, a spokesman for PTT — an oil and gas company based in Thailand that wants to build an ethane cracker on the far side of the river, in Dilles Bottom, Ohio. “But really we’re kind of in between phases right now.” The plant would turn the region’s plentiful natural gas into plastics. It’s taken years to develop, and a final decision on whether the company would build the plant was due this summer. But then came the pandemic. “It just kind of changed the game for all industries, including this one. And so they have had to put off their announcement of a decision,” Williamson said.

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