ARE PETROCHEMICALS AND PLASTIC THE FUTURE OF THE OIL INDUSTRY WITH A POTENTIAL DECREASE IN GLOBAL OIL DEMAND?

Industry Global News24 | October 11, 2019

According to a recent report by the IEA (International Energy Agency), “the international electric automobile fleet exceeded 5.1 million, up 2 million from the previous year and nearly doubling the quantity of latest automobile sales.” a similar report estimates that by 2030, electric vehicle sales can reach 23 million annually with a 130 million electrical vehicles on the roads. To some, the decline of the inner combustion engine combined with increasing interest in renewable energy sources portends the loss of revenue for the oil and gas business. However, because the antecedently mentioned drivers of world oil demand are decreasing, the demand for petrochemicals specifically ethylene and gas, that are accustomed to creating plastics are on the increase. Companies like kW Plastics already supply to shop for and recycle plastic scraps from firms wanting to eliminate their waste responsibly.

Spotlight

Brazil is a large and diverse country. It has characteristics favorable to embedding green chemistry education in schools and universities, including its rich biodiversity and vast availability of natural resources, However, it also presents many challenges including the diverse culture and educational approaches in different regions of the country and the challenging context in many schools, which lack laboratories and experimental classes. The workshop “Green Chemistry Experiments for Remote Locations”, a partnership between the American Chemical Society and the Brazilian Green Chemistry School, brought together teachers, professors, and researchers from Brazilian schools and universities with international experts to discuss possible strategies to help spread a practical green chemistry education in Brazil.

Spotlight

Brazil is a large and diverse country. It has characteristics favorable to embedding green chemistry education in schools and universities, including its rich biodiversity and vast availability of natural resources, However, it also presents many challenges including the diverse culture and educational approaches in different regions of the country and the challenging context in many schools, which lack laboratories and experimental classes. The workshop “Green Chemistry Experiments for Remote Locations”, a partnership between the American Chemical Society and the Brazilian Green Chemistry School, brought together teachers, professors, and researchers from Brazilian schools and universities with international experts to discuss possible strategies to help spread a practical green chemistry education in Brazil.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

Oil Refining and Petrochemical Companies Expands Naphtha Cracking Centers

Hanwha Total | January 21, 2021

South Korean oil refining and petrochemical organizations, for example, Hanwha Total and Yeocheon NCC are extending their naphtha cracking centers (NCCs) for income source expansion and economies of scale, separately. Yeocheon NCC as of late finished the extension of its NCC and butadiene creation facilities by contributing 740 billion won for around two years. The trial operations will end this week and business activities will be started right away. At that point, the organization's annual ethylene and butadiene creation volumes will increment from 1.95 million tons to 2.3 million tons and from 240,000 tons to 370,000 tons, respectively. Hanwha Total's NCC development is planned to be finished in the first half. The organization has contributed 147 billion won since 2018 to that end. When the business activity starts, its yearly ethylene creation volume will increment from 1.4 million tons to 1.55 million tons. LG Chem is planning to continue the operation of its NCC in Yeosu this month after the shutdown brought about by a fire a last year. It will grow the middle to 800,000 tons before the current year's over with the goal that its yearly creation limit can arrive two million tons. Lotte Chemical is running a NCC in Daesan, South Chungcheong Province and its annual ethylene output is 1.1 million tons.

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Ravago Acquires a Stake in Alterra Energy, a Leading Advanced Recycling Company

Ravago | July 22, 2021

Alterra Energy, an innovative advanced recycling technology company, and Ravago, a global leader in polymer recycling and distribution, announced today that Ravago has acquired an equity interest in Alterra Energy. Ravago will be a strategic partner in supplying pre-processed waste plastic to Alterra Energy's Akron, Ohio, facility -- which currently has the capacity to liquefy up to 60 tons per day of waste plastic for use as a feedstock for the manufacturing of plastics and chemicals -- as well as for future commercial installations. Alterra Energy and Ravago plan to combine forces to provide integrated recycling solutions that support the transition toward decarbonization, decreasing virgin fossil resource dependency and increasing circularity for its petrochemical and chemical partners. The Ravago transaction is the second strategic partnership this year for Alterra Energy. In January, Alterra Energy announced that Neste, the world's leading provider of renewable diesel and sustainable aviation fuel, and an expert in delivering drop-in renewable and circular chemical solutions, acquired a minority stake in the company. Alterra Energy, which has developed and commercialized a continuous advanced recycling technology that transforms end-of-life plastics into petrochemical feedstock, will process the Ravago-supplied waste plastic into ISCC PLUS certified material. Alterra will then market this material for further refining and conversion into circular building blocks for the plastics and chemicals producing industry. About Alterra Energy Alterra Energy is solving the plastic pollution challenge on a global scale with the development and commercialization of a continuous advanced recycling technology. At its Akron, Ohio plant, the company converts plastic destined for landfills into petrochemical materials that can be further refined into new plastic production and other petrochemical products. Alterra Energy utilizes a scalable, patented, thermochemical liquefaction technology to process and recycle waste plastic, diverting millions of pounds of plastic from landfills. Its team of engineers, experts and partners are driven by one purpose: creating a cleaner planet for future generations. Alterra Energy licenses its technology to entities looking to recycle more challenging plastics or seeking more sustainable products. It is partnering with companies in the solid waste industry, government entities and petrochemical companies. About Ravago Ravago, headquartered in Luxembourg, provides superior distribution, resale, compounding and recycling services for our customers, deploying advanced technology solutions to convert plastic raw materials into products that improve the sustainable quality of our life. Ravago represents more than 6,600,000 metric tons of annual polymer sales, serving more than 50,000 active customers through 325+ locations across more than 55+ countries worldwide. Ravago's production capability consists of 45+ manufacturing facilities of which 19 recycling and compounding plants in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa with a combined annual capacity of over 775,000 metric tons; 13 production plants in Europe that are offering finished product solutions for the building sector and 7 plants and 6 application laboratories for our chemicals business. This all would not have been possible without the contributions of its 8,000 employees.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

NIH grant supports Neufeldt’s fundamental research into chemical reactions

NIH | November 27, 2020

A natural physicist zeroing in on metal impetuses is the most recent Montana State University specialist to have their work perceived and subsidized through a National Institutes of Health program with an accentuation on examining wide logical inquiries. Sharon Neufeldt, an associate teacher in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in MSU's College of Letters and Science, gotten the Maximizing Investigators' Research Award through the NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences in September to help her basic examination into creating and expanding the productivity of natural synthetic responses. While basically making one of a kind responses might be reason for festivity among her understudies and individual researchers, Neufeldt said the NIH uphold avows that this line of exploration holds opportunities for more extensive ramifications to general wellbeing. “One always wants to feel like the work they’re doing is meaningful to somebody other than themselves,” she said. In practical terms, creating more efficient reactions could translate into quicker development of new pharmaceuticals and potentially lower costs for consumers, Neufeldt said. “A lot of the work that my group has ended up doing and being interested in is relevant to the NIH,” Neufeldt explained. “What we’re trying to do is ultimately develop new ways to make molecules.” For the type of chemistry studied in Neufeldt's lab, a pair of organic molecules in the presence of a metal catalyst will normally react in a predictable way. However, Neufeldt’s research group is engineering catalysts to alter the outcome of the reaction to result in unconventional products, hoping to develop ways to increase the yield or decrease the steps needed to create compounds. These catalysts comprised individual metal atoms ringed by small organic molecules called ligands that tune which properties are expressed in chemical reactions. By altering these ligands, Neufeldt's group can influence what happens in metal-catalyzed reactions.

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