American Chemistry Council challenges research in new book on EDCs

Chemical Watch | January 08, 2019

A book on endocrine disrupting chemicals and human health has been met with claims that the author's research lacks "scientific quality, credibility and reliability", even before it is officially published. Sicker, fatter, poorer: The urgent threat of hormone-disrupting chemicals to our health and future ... and what we can do about it, was written by US scientist Leonardo Trasande. In the book, published today, Professor Trasande, a medical doctor, "exposes the chemicals that disrupt our hormonal systems and damage our health in irreparable ways", the publisher says on its website. "He shows us where these chemicals hide – in our homes, our schools, at work, in our food, and countless other places we can’t control – as well as the workings of policy that protects the continued use of these chemicals in our lives … Unfortunately, nowhere is safe."

Spotlight

Greenpeace is campaigning to stop industry poisoning our water with hazardous, persistent and hormone-disrupting chemicals. The Detox campaign challenges top brands to make amends by working with their suppliers to eliminate all hazardous chemicals across their entire supply chain, and the entire life-cycle of their products. This is a priority list of hazardous chemicals which would-be champions for a toxic-free future need to help eliminate.

Spotlight

Greenpeace is campaigning to stop industry poisoning our water with hazardous, persistent and hormone-disrupting chemicals. The Detox campaign challenges top brands to make amends by working with their suppliers to eliminate all hazardous chemicals across their entire supply chain, and the entire life-cycle of their products. This is a priority list of hazardous chemicals which would-be champions for a toxic-free future need to help eliminate.

Related News

Potential challenges and opportunities of using chemical recycling for plastic wastes

Biomarket insights | August 24, 2020

Plastic polymers comprise about 40% of the output of the global chemical recycling sector1. As we use and make plastic today, for each kilogram that is not reused or recycled, another kilogram is produced from non-renewable, fossil-based raw materials. Recycling of plastics waste into new plastics is an approach to increase the circularity of supply chains. According to the ‘Accelerating circular supply chains for plastics’ report by Closed Loop Partners, the demand for recycled plastics is strong, however the current supply of recycled plastics meets just 6% of this demand.

Read More

Deloitte Study: The Future of Work in Oil, Gas and Chemicals

Prnewswire | October 06, 2020

The U.S. oil, natural gas and chemicals (OG&C) industry slashed 107,000 jobs from March to August 2020, the fastest rate of layoffs in the industry's history. Heightening employment cyclicality and layoffs are challenging the industry's reputation as a reliable, long-term employer. The sensitivity of U.S. OG&C employment to oil prices is extremely high, with a dollar change in oil price potentially affecting 3,000 upstream and oilfield services jobs. In a business-as-usual scenario of waiting and responding to oil price cycles, about 70% of jobs lost during the pandemic may not return by the end of 2021 at $45 per barrel This downturn or the "great compression" is like no other, challenging fundamental and deeply interconnected dimensions of the industry's work, workforce and workplace.

Read More

Chemical industry: Trapping of acetylene contaminants

Sciencedaily | August 31, 2020

Ethylene is the most important chemical precursor for ethanol and polyethylene and is mainly produced by steam cracking. Although the ethylene fraction is usually very pure (more than 99%), remaining traces of acetylene contaminants can destroy the catalysts used in downstream processes. As ethylene and acetylene are very similar and only differ in the amount of hydrogen atoms -- ethylene has four hydrogen atoms bound to two carbon atoms, acetylene has two -- the separation of both gases is elaborate and difficult. The current industrial processes rely on distillation, which consumes a huge amount of energy.

Read More