Why chemical characterization is the best way to assess patient risk

| February 11, 2020

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Everyone is very familiar with the phrase when buying a house: All that really matters are three things - location, location, and location. This same principle applies to extractables and leachables chemistry analysis – the three things that truly matter are identification, identification, and identification. The greatest growth in the past ten years in demonstrating the safety of medical devices and container closure systems for drugs has been using analytical chemistry to determine what chemicals can leach from the device and what the patient is exposed to during its intended use.

Spotlight

RG Chemical Safety

This is the business for Richard Greenwood, Consultant in issues relating to workplace chemical hazards and safety, and workplace trainer. Richard Greenwood has worked in the area of chemical safety and hazards classification for over 20 years. In that time he has worked on interpretation of and compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety and Dangerous Goods (Storage and Handling) Regulations in industries ranging from research and training laboratories to large scale chemical manufacturing plant. He commenced interpretation of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (the GHS) in 2002. Working as a Hazardous Chemicals Consultant he was called upon to provide interpretation of complex regulatory requirements to meet industry product movement timescales.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Reimagining the Workforce with Anglo American

Article | June 21, 2021

“At Anglo-American, we’re really focused on finding the best ways to attract the most talented people in the industry and effectively equipping our existing workforce based on what they need today and what the future will mean for their careers. We’re also committed to providing learning opportunities that lead to growth and development in the communities in which we operate. Our people are a strategic advantage. We want to ensure that continues to be the case as the mining industry evolves and faces more disruption.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Organic Oil Recovery improves productivity of existing reservoirs

Article | June 21, 2021

MAY 2021 ///Vol 242 No. 5 FEATURES Organic Oil Recovery improves productivity of existing reservoirs A transitional technology producing excellent results in extracting hard-to-reach oil is attracting the attention of many large operators. Ancient, resident microbes are used to liberate large oil deposits in depleted reservoirs, thanks to science uncovered by studying the humble Australian koala. Roger Findlay, Organic Oil Recovery It began in almost outlandish fashion, with a scientist’s fascination with the complex digestive system of an Australian marsupial, the koala. Today, it has evolved into a green technology that is helping major producers around the world potentially reach billions of dollars of oil that they feared they could never access or bring to the surface. As the pressure on the oil and gas industry continues to grow, to find new ways to operate with less impact on the environment, Organic Oil Recovery (OOR) is reducing the need for further exploration. Instead, it is helping producers focus on the reservoirs already in situ to extract even more precious resource—at very low cost—from deep below the ground or seas, across a myriad of jurisdictions and geographies.

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Optimizing chemical production using data-driven, AI-enabled hybrid modeling

Article | June 21, 2021

Smart use of your plant’s data can take process efficiency to a higher level. Hybrid models driven by artificial intelligence deliver the best results for the least effort. And you don’t need a data science degree to enjoy them. Data is everywhere these days – and the volumes of it are growing exponentially all the time. We’re used to smart uses of it in our everyday lives. Like Amazon and Netflix using our past behavior to tempt us with new products or shows, even making them more appealing by tailoring how they look based on carefully constructed, data-driven profiles of our tastes. Much of that heavy lifting is done by artificial intelligence (AI). In chemical production, process control systems have been collecting data measurements during continuous or batch manufacturing for decades.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

We can solve the plastic waste crisis but we don’t have much time

Article | June 21, 2021

IN 2015, a global agreement was reached that 8m tonnes a year of plastic waste entering the oceans was unacceptable, according to this September 2020 article in The Conversation. This was the amount of plastic that was estimated to have ended up in the oceans in 2010. “Several international platforms emerged to address the crisis, including Our Ocean, the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the G7 Ocean Plastic Charter, among others,” continued the article. But in 2020, an estimated 24m-34m tonnes of plastic waste was forecast to enter our lakes, rivers and oceans. This could reach as much as 90m tonnes in 2030 if the current trajectory continued, said The Conversation. This is the type of information out there, free to view on the internet and accessible via a very quick Google search, representing a major challenges for our industry. I cannot of course verify the numbers. But they are out there. Also out there is a May 2019 article by the World Economic Forum (WEF), which provided a good summary of research into what experts believed was the scale of the waste problem in the developing world.

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Spotlight

RG Chemical Safety

This is the business for Richard Greenwood, Consultant in issues relating to workplace chemical hazards and safety, and workplace trainer. Richard Greenwood has worked in the area of chemical safety and hazards classification for over 20 years. In that time he has worked on interpretation of and compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety and Dangerous Goods (Storage and Handling) Regulations in industries ranging from research and training laboratories to large scale chemical manufacturing plant. He commenced interpretation of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (the GHS) in 2002. Working as a Hazardous Chemicals Consultant he was called upon to provide interpretation of complex regulatory requirements to meet industry product movement timescales.

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