Transfer of Toxic Liquid with Polypropylene Pump

Transfer of toxic liquids can be dangerous without the right equipment! The polypropylene pump in the video uses an SP-450V motor with variable speed. The speed is adjusted accordingly to avoid splashes and spillage of the liquid. NB: Always wear safety workwear when handling chemicals and toxic liquids.

Spotlight

Nesher Pharmaceuticals (USA) LLC

Nesher Pharmaceuticals (USA) LLC, a generic pharmaceutical manufacturer located in St. Louis, MO, is a subsidiary of Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc. Our business is redefining the standards for pharmaceutical performance, shaped by a passion to deliver value through innovation and an unwavering commitment to compliance. We equate business success with an environment in which employees are encouraged to maximize their potential through personal growth and accountability, resulting in outstanding results for both our people and the customers we serve. If you have the drive and desire to reach a higher level in your career as part of a growth-centric team, come join us!

OTHER ARTICLES
Chemical Management

Closing the loop: Real-time measurement of oil in water for process facilities

Article | July 14, 2022

When an oilfield’s reservoir pressure is depleted during primary recovery, additional oil can be recovered by recycling the produced water and injecting it back into the reservoir. Water management is critical for such water and water-alternating-gas (WAG) floods. In its Permian basin operations, Occidental recovers, recycles, and re-injects large volumes of water for its enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. With real-time monitoring of oil in water (OiW) delivering reliable and continuous data, Occidental identified a way to optimize the recovery process and is working with NOV to expand the use of OiW monitoring equipment.

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Chemical Technology

Pandemic’s third wave seems unlikely to damage global petrochemicals demand

Article | June 6, 2022

Petrochemical stocks plunged worldwide on 19 July ahead of the Q2 earnings season. The declines were consistent with those in economically sensitive sectors such as steel, copper, automotive and housing,” wrote my ICIS colleague, Joseph Chang, in this Insight article.

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Chemical Technology

The Future of Supply Chain Management for Chemical Companies

Article | August 8, 2022

Individual consumers expect tailored products and services. Color, size, quantity, payment method, and delivery channel options abound. The chemical sector is also now following this suit of action. The global chemicals supply chain has grown steadily for three decades. Chemical businesses are improving their supply chain capabilities to handle complexity and meet client demands. This includes implementing advanced data-driven and cloud-based technologies that enable faster, more flexible, and tailored customer interactions. Areas of innovation for chemical companies Living Segmentation Living segmentation can help chemical businesses better serve clients and satisfy their expectations. This entails adapting supply chain capabilities to each customer's needs. Asset-light Network An asset-light network involves developing an ecosystem of partners to add capabilities and value to your supply chain beyond standard co-manufacturing, co-packing, and third-party or last-mile logistics providers. In addition, it should include technology partners that help chemical businesses innovate and be adaptable. Data and Applied Intelligence Improving speed, agility, and efficiency in global supply chains demands comprehensive visibility and the correct information. Data provides visibility and insights. The key to providing excellent customer service is gathering the appropriate data and using it strategically to get important insight. The industry generates a ton of data, which is excellent news. In response to last year's supply chain delays, corporations are building supply chains with geographically spread shipping/supplier choices. Real-time visibility and enhanced analytics can be used to track delays by providing revised ETAs and analyzing downstream implications. Data-driven insights can alert organizations of a delay almost immediately and help them acquire raw materials from another supplier to reduce the domino impact downstream. Chemical businesses must rethink their supply chains to implement living segmentation, asset-light networks, data, and AI.

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Chemical Technology

Resin and Polymeric Binders for Inks

Article | May 19, 2021

The market size for polymeric and resin binders in the global printing ink marketwas estimated to be over 1,200,000 MT in 2020, with a CAGR of about five percent. A major driver of this growth comes from the packaging industry, due to increases in consumer spending and online shopping, as well as demand for processed and packaged foods and beverages. In addition, increased use of water-based inks is promoting market growth, off-setting environmental and health concerns regarding solvent-based inks in addition to strict environmental protection policies. Water-based inks are projected to overtake solvent-based inks due to environmental regulations, the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the pressroom, and improvements in overall print quality. Ink formulations are complex mixtures, consisting of four basic component classes: pigments, polymeric binder resins, solvents or an aqueous dispersant media, and additives, such as surfactants, waxes, and rheology modifiers that enhance print quality. The purpose of the resin binder is to disperse and carry the ink pigment to the substrate, stabilize the pigment and additives dispersion to prevent settling, and provide print properties such as ink transfer behavior, setting, and drying characteristics. The binder also contributes surface appearance and gloss, strength and flexibility, chemical and solvent resistance, and also rub resistance. Ink binders can be categorized into the following polymer and resin types: acrylics, polyurethanes, polyamides, modified resins, hydrocarbon resins, and modified cellulosics.

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Spotlight

Nesher Pharmaceuticals (USA) LLC

Nesher Pharmaceuticals (USA) LLC, a generic pharmaceutical manufacturer located in St. Louis, MO, is a subsidiary of Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc. Our business is redefining the standards for pharmaceutical performance, shaped by a passion to deliver value through innovation and an unwavering commitment to compliance. We equate business success with an environment in which employees are encouraged to maximize their potential through personal growth and accountability, resulting in outstanding results for both our people and the customers we serve. If you have the drive and desire to reach a higher level in your career as part of a growth-centric team, come join us!

Related News

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

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Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

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New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

Read More

Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Read More

New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

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