Transfer of Toxic Liquid with Polypropylene Pump

Transfer of toxic liquids can be dangerous without the right equipment! The polypropylene pump in the video uses an SP-450V motor with variable speed. The speed is adjusted accordingly to avoid splashes and spillage of the liquid. NB: Always wear safety workwear when handling chemicals and toxic liquids.

Spotlight

General Plastic Extrusions, Inc

Custom manufacturer of polyethylene bags, tubing, and sheeting. ISO 9001:2008 Certified. Located in Prescott, Wisconsin, General Plastic manufacturer’s polyethylene packaging products to the Food, and Industrial industries. General has a wide range of manufacturing capabilities to meet its customers growing needs. Recently General Plastics has added co-extrusion capabilities which have expanded its markets and product lines.

OTHER ARTICLES
Chemical Technology

Organic Oil Recovery improves productivity of existing reservoirs

Article | July 20, 2022

MAY 2021 ///Vol 242 No. 5 FEATURES Organic Oil Recovery improves productivity of existing reservoirs A transitional technology producing excellent results in extracting hard-to-reach oil is attracting the attention of many large operators. Ancient, resident microbes are used to liberate large oil deposits in depleted reservoirs, thanks to science uncovered by studying the humble Australian koala. Roger Findlay, Organic Oil Recovery It began in almost outlandish fashion, with a scientist’s fascination with the complex digestive system of an Australian marsupial, the koala. Today, it has evolved into a green technology that is helping major producers around the world potentially reach billions of dollars of oil that they feared they could never access or bring to the surface. As the pressure on the oil and gas industry continues to grow, to find new ways to operate with less impact on the environment, Organic Oil Recovery (OOR) is reducing the need for further exploration. Instead, it is helping producers focus on the reservoirs already in situ to extract even more precious resource—at very low cost—from deep below the ground or seas, across a myriad of jurisdictions and geographies.

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Chemical Management

Petrochemical buyers, after a very difficult pandemic, can gain from China-driven deflation

Article | July 22, 2021

BUYERS OF polypropylene (PP) and other polymers and petrochemicals have had an incredibly difficult pandemic. Firstly, the converters and brand owners expected doom and gloom last March. At the time it seemed logical to expect a cratering of demand as the global economy pretty much imploded. Just looking at forecasts for GDP, parallels were drawn with the Global Financial Crisis when collapses in growth led to a cratering of polymers demand. The US is a good example where PP demand declined by 12% in 2008 over 2007. Demand then fell by a further 5% in 2009 over 2008.But what we all missed was the complete dislocation of polymers and petrochemicals demand from GDP. As economies registered historic declines, consumption went up. PP demand went through the roof, firstly for food packaging and hygiene applications.Then consumption for the durable goods made from PP also smashed through the rafters as we bought white goods (PP is used to make components of washing machines), consumer electronics (PP is used to make some electronic components) and carpets (PP fibres are used here).

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Chemical Technology

Southeast polyolefins demand growth could be negative again in 2021

Article | July 14, 2022

BEFORE the pandemic, GDP growth rates in the developing world were always higher than in developed economies.And because developing economies had much lower levels of petrochemicals consumption than their rich counterparts, it meant that the multiples over GDP were higher than in the rich word, where consumption was pretty much saturated. For instance, polyethylene (PE) demand in a developed country such as Germany might have grown at 0.3% times GDP whereas in Indonesia the growth could have been one or more times higher than the rate of growth in GDP.But as The Economist wrote in this 11 July article: “In 2021 the poorest countries, which are desperately short of vaccines, are forecast to grow more slowly than rich countries for only the third time in 25 years.” Might the multiples over GDP growth also be adversely affected in the developing world, trending lower than the historic norms? They will almost certainly remain higher than the rich countries. But here is the thing: as millions more people are pushed back into extreme poverty by the pandemic or are denied the opportunity to achieve middle-income status, I believe that developing-world multiples may well decline.Escaping extreme poverty means being able to, say, afford a whole bottle of shampoo for the first time rather than a single-serve sachet, thereby raising per capita polymers consumption.

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Chemical Technology

The Digital Transformation of the Chemical Industry: The Key Trends

Article | August 2, 2022

From novel process technologies to sustainable plastics— the chemical industry is scaling up its digital initiatives. This has opened new doors for organizations to explore opportunities to increase efficiency and streamline the process. Admittedly, the chemical industry has been a little slower in implementing digital transformation. But COVID-19 has vastly increased the momentum of digitization among chemical plants. According to a KPMG survey, 96% of industry CEOs saw digital transformation accelerate in their organizations, with 48 percent saying it advanced by a few years. In addition, according to a recent Manufacturing Leadership Council (MLC) survey, 82% of respondents agreed that the pandemic had "created a new sense of urgency" in driving investment in new technologies and digitalization. Digital transformation solutions offer tremendous potential in the chemical sector. It can play a significant role in driving more value. So let's dig deeper and look at key technologies in bringing digital transformation to the chemical industry. Circular Economy Chemical manufacturers cannot exist within their own four walls any longer. They recognize the importance of working with their customers and other businesses and organizations to conserve resources and protect the environment. Chemical companies may source raw materials from recyclers as part of a circular economy, which necessitates fool proof solutions to confirm their quality and availability. Circular economy consortiums may advocate for reducing environmental threats such as ocean plastics or exposure to hazardous chemicals, opening up new avenues for innovation. Customers are constantly looking for new ways to reduce waste and protect their ecosystems. For example, farmers may benefit from solutions that can instantly analyze soil quality, weather, and crops to determine the best products and schedule for applying fertilizers, crop protectants, or new seeds. Using this data, they use only what they need, generate less waste, and maximize output. Error-Proof Operations Chemical firms are also embracing technology to achieve operational excellence. They've discovered the benefits of using machine learning andIoT technologies to automate standard back-end processes. Technologies such as these reduce the need for human intervention — and thus the possibility of human error. Blockchain technology can also significantly reduce counterfeit chemicals' use, which is especially important for chemical manufacturers who supply products to the pharmaceutical or agricultural industries. In addition, blockchain technology can enable track-and-trace processes that require less work and waste while protecting the enterprise's reputation. Staying Sharp in the Dynamic Market Staying agile in an uncertain M&A environment is a top priority for some businesses. For example, chemical firms must be able to quickly divest assets, adjust portfolios, and adapt operations in response to market changes. Technology can provide executives with the visibility into operations, shipments, and market conditions required to make critical decisions and remain agile. Data Analytics The chemical industry is leveraging cloud-based storage systems to store and share confidential data anytime and anywhere. Additionally, data analytics solutions can analyze all the data effectively to provide valuable insights to the industry. This will help you make meaningful decisions in real-time.

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Spotlight

General Plastic Extrusions, Inc

Custom manufacturer of polyethylene bags, tubing, and sheeting. ISO 9001:2008 Certified. Located in Prescott, Wisconsin, General Plastic manufacturer’s polyethylene packaging products to the Food, and Industrial industries. General has a wide range of manufacturing capabilities to meet its customers growing needs. Recently General Plastics has added co-extrusion capabilities which have expanded its markets and product lines.

Related News

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

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Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

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New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

Read More

Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Read More

New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

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