Transfer of Toxic Liquid with Polypropylene Pump

February 27, 2020 | 51 views

Transfer of toxic liquids can be dangerous without the right equipment! The polypropylene pump in the video uses an SP-450V motor with variable speed. The speed is adjusted accordingly to avoid splashes and spillage of the liquid. NB: Always wear safety workwear when handling chemicals and toxic liquids.

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Sika

Sika is a specialty chemicals company with a leading position in the development and production of systems and products for bonding, sealing, damping, reinforcing and protecting in the building sector and the motor vehicle industry. Sika has subsidiaries in 97 countries around the world and manufactures in over 160 factories. Its more than 17,000 employees generate annual sales of CHF 5.5 billion.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Transporting biological and chemical materials - what you need to know

Article | August 8, 2022

The landscape of biological and chemical logistics has changed rapidly - as have the regulatory frameworks around it. What has not necessarily kept pace is the end-user understanding of the nature of these logistical processes, their opportunities and their constraints. Twenty years ago, the transmission of biological and chemical materials was limited to a small range of organisations: usually national and international research companies, hospitals, major university departments, police and military departments with forensic responsibilities.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Setting record straight on testing harm in chemicals

Article | July 14, 2022

The modern world is built on chemicals, be it the medicines we use, or cleaning fluids, crop protection products, or the raw materials for everything from laptops and mobile phones to clothes and furniture. Across all, we have created an entire modern society with chemicals, and, as a result, constantly stretched the size of the world population we can feed, clothe and shelter. Yet, balancing all the gains from the modern chemistry around us against any negative environmental and human impact has been a rising concern, making for ever greater focus on testing and on risk assessment.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

Why chemical characterization is the best way to assess patient risk

Article | July 22, 2021

Everyone is very familiar with the phrase when buying a house: All that really matters are three things - location, location, and location. This same principle applies to extractables and leachables chemistry analysis – the three things that truly matter are identification, identification, and identification. The greatest growth in the past ten years in demonstrating the safety of medical devices and container closure systems for drugs has been using analytical chemistry to determine what chemicals can leach from the device and what the patient is exposed to during its intended use.

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How Chemical Companies Benefit from the Experience Economy

Article | February 10, 2020

To feel or experience from a business engagement started with customer experience mainly in the consumer products business. Today it has extended to even knowledge industries like the chemical industry where experiencing or feeling can be leveraged to include all stake holders from customers primarily to employees to supply chain people & suppliers and all else. With digital technologies this has become easier than before. The benefits from promoting the ‘feel’ or ‘experience’ emotion could be multifarious for the chemical industry as described in this article.

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Spotlight

Sika

Sika is a specialty chemicals company with a leading position in the development and production of systems and products for bonding, sealing, damping, reinforcing and protecting in the building sector and the motor vehicle industry. Sika has subsidiaries in 97 countries around the world and manufactures in over 160 factories. Its more than 17,000 employees generate annual sales of CHF 5.5 billion.

Related News

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

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Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

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New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

NRDC and Partners Calls out EPA for Evaluation Process of Toxic Chemical Risks

NRDC, EPA | July 17, 2020

NRDC (the Natural Resources Defense Council) together with partners, today asked a federal court to review the Environmental Protection Agency’s woefully inadequate process for evaluating risks of the toxic chemical methylene chloride. A solvent used in paint strippers and other products, methylene chloride has already been linked to some 60 deaths, at least 4 of which occurred after the EPA refused to finalize a ban on its use in paint strippers. “This is the agency’s very first risk evaluation under the updated federal toxics law and it sets the stage for future limits on this deadly chemical,” said Selena Kyle, senior attorney and managing litigator for NRDC. “But the agency has underestimated the risks to people exposed to methylene chloride on the job, and all but ignored risks to people who live near facilities that release it into the air, water, and soil. When EPA moves forward to regulate the chemical, it must consider these risks.”

Read More

Research finds potentially toxic chemicals used in smartphones and TVs escaping into environment

CBC | December 17, 2019

An international research team is sounding the alarm about potentially harmful chemicals — used to manufacture screens for devices like smartphones and TVs — being found in homes and other buildings even when the devices aren't present. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found chemicals called liquid crystal monomers in household dust samples collected in China. That's problematic, because the chemicals are supposed to stay contained within the screens. "They're supposedly sealed in the screens when they're made, but obviously they do come out," said Prof. John Giesy, a Canada Research Chair in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Read More

New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

EurekAlert | November 22, 2019

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The mechanism for the record-breaking gas uptake by the MOF, characterized by researchers using neutron scattering at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, could lead to air pollution control and remediation technologies that cost-effectively remove the pollutant from the air and convert it into nitric acid for use in producing fertilizer, rocket propellant, nylon and other products. As reported in Nature Chemistry, the material, denoted as MFM-520, can capture atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient pressures and temperatures--even at low concentrations and during flow--in the presence of moisture, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide.

Read More

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