How Is the SCIP Database Different From the REACH Regulation

| February 14, 2020

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Companies operating in the European Union (EU) must submit data when introducing articles containing Substances of Very High Concern (SVHCs) above the 0.1 percent weight by weight (w/w) threshold. The reporting trigger for an in-scope article is currently derived from the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation’s Candidate List of SVHCs, but the data requirements for the SCIP database, triggered by the EU Waste Framework Directive (WFD), vary widely from those required by the REACH Regulation.

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MaaS Pharma Chemicals

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OTHER ARTICLES

Ensuring a Winning Strategy for Value Chain Optimization of the Refining and Petrochemical Industries

Article | March 24, 2020

The Refining and petrochemical industries have a projection to keep growing in the next two decades and companies that are investing in new technology today will be ahead of your competition in about 2 years. The digitalization of the value chain, also known as value chain optimization, is a complex task. Part of this complexity comes from the diversity of challenges that occurs in different areas of the value chain within each operation, as we addressed in the article Understanding the Refining and Petrochemical Value Chains to Drive Optimization. Many companies still fail to obtain economic return from their investment in digitalization and we presented the most common challenges in the article Challenges of Achieving Value Chain Optimization in the Refining and Petrochemical Industries. With so many challenges, how can businesses ensure they have a strategic digital transformation program that will successfully result in the optimization of your value chain?

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Coronavirus Impact on Fine Chemical Supply Chain

Article | March 24, 2020

Coronavirus, more accurately referred to as COVID-19, is beginning to impact global supply chains in a tangible way. Although it is impossible to forecast the effect of numerous epidemics worldwide on the fine chemical supply chain specifically, reports suggest that as much as 94% of the Fortune 1000 are already experiencing coronavirus-related supply disruptions. Fortune cites the devastating 2011 tsunami as a case study of how unforeseeable disasters can severely disturb supply chains with far-reaching ramifications. Damage to Mitsubishi Gas Chemical factories in the area affected by the tsunami led to a shortage of bismaleimide triazine (BT) resin; a critical material for electronic substrates.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

We can solve the plastic waste crisis but we don’t have much time

Article | March 24, 2020

IN 2015, a global agreement was reached that 8m tonnes a year of plastic waste entering the oceans was unacceptable, according to this September 2020 article in The Conversation. This was the amount of plastic that was estimated to have ended up in the oceans in 2010. “Several international platforms emerged to address the crisis, including Our Ocean, the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the G7 Ocean Plastic Charter, among others,” continued the article. But in 2020, an estimated 24m-34m tonnes of plastic waste was forecast to enter our lakes, rivers and oceans. This could reach as much as 90m tonnes in 2030 if the current trajectory continued, said The Conversation. This is the type of information out there, free to view on the internet and accessible via a very quick Google search, representing a major challenges for our industry. I cannot of course verify the numbers. But they are out there. Also out there is a May 2019 article by the World Economic Forum (WEF), which provided a good summary of research into what experts believed was the scale of the waste problem in the developing world.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

Global polyethylene demand boom likely, increasing the sustainability challenge

Article | March 24, 2020

IT FEELS LIKE several lifetimes ago. If you recall, way back in November-December 2019 Asian variable cost integrated naphtha-based polyethylene (PE) margins turned negative because of the increase in US capacity. Then in January the following year, deep Asian and Middle East operating rate cuts returned some order to the market. Then, bang, as we all know, the pandemic arrived and turned everything on its head. The pandemic has, in my view, accentuated trends that were already well underway. I believe this means that the supply-driven downturn that started in late 2019 will not return.Long before coronavirus upended everyone’s lives, PE demand was becoming increasingly divorced from GDP growth because of the shifting nature of end-use demand. Booming internet sales was, I believe, a major factor behind the split between the growth of the overall economies in the developed world plus China and PE demand.The average product bought online is dropped 17 times because of the large number of people involved in the logistics chain, according to Forbes. This had led to a surge in demand for protective packaging made not from PE and other polymers such as polypropylene, expandable polystyrene and PET films (I will look at their demand growth prospects in later posts).Despite sustainability pressures, the scale of demand for stuff bought online translated to a lot more consumption of virgin polymers.

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MaaS Pharma Chemicals

To become a specialist trading house for providing global quality materials at Indian customer’s door step in high growth Pharmaceuticals & food markets which includes laboratory and pharmaceuticals materials.

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