Hazardous Chemicals & the GHS: An Introduction

November 22, 2019 | 184 views

Ironically, the (deep breath) Global Harmonised System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals was meant to make things easier, but for some, the management of hazardous chemicals seemed to get more complex with its introduction. The previous management regime was already complex enough, requiring organisations that use hazardous chemicals to interpret a complex array of information from Health and Safety legislation, Dangerous Goods Legislation, Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), seemingly endless Australian Standards and the 1200 odd pages of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code. In this context, it's hardly surprising that many organisations struggled to navigate their way through the complexity and even less surprising that the GHS, with new information and jargon, didn't help.

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ViVoChem B.V.

ViVoChem is a stock-holding distributor of chemicals in Almelo (The Netherlands). Our main activities are storage, handling and distribution of chemical products. ViVoChem is part of the German Büfa Group and has got more than 125 years of experience in handling chemicals. The chemical division of the Büfa Group consists of more than 100 people working together.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

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Spotlight

ViVoChem B.V.

ViVoChem is a stock-holding distributor of chemicals in Almelo (The Netherlands). Our main activities are storage, handling and distribution of chemical products. ViVoChem is part of the German Büfa Group and has got more than 125 years of experience in handling chemicals. The chemical division of the Büfa Group consists of more than 100 people working together.

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