Hazardous Chemicals & the GHS: An Introduction

November 22, 2019 | 119 views

Ironically, the (deep breath) Global Harmonised System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals was meant to make things easier, but for some, the management of hazardous chemicals seemed to get more complex with its introduction. The previous management regime was already complex enough, requiring organisations that use hazardous chemicals to interpret a complex array of information from Health and Safety legislation, Dangerous Goods Legislation, Safety Data Sheets (SDSs), seemingly endless Australian Standards and the 1200 odd pages of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code. In this context, it's hardly surprising that many organisations struggled to navigate their way through the complexity and even less surprising that the GHS, with new information and jargon, didn't help.

Spotlight

Dura Chemicals, Inc

Dura Chemical Corporation was founded in India in 1948 as a supplier of raw materials for the coatings, plastics, rubber, and cosmetics industries. In 1961, the company commenced production of additives for the paint, printing ink, and PVC industries. Over the next five decades, Dura emerged as a leader in the production of metal organics including metal driers, PVC heat stabilizers and additives for the coatings, UPR, polyurethane, lubrication, and fuel industries. In 2006, we acquired the North American metal carboxylate and anti-skinning business of a major supplier; this considerably broadened our production and sales footprint, adding warehouses and offices from Mexico to Canada. Today, Dura has research, development, and manufacturing plants in India, a lab and production arm in the USA, and supply capabilities worldwide. Since 1994, we have been doing business in the USA as Dura Chemicals Inc., based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Ultimately, Dura Chemicals distinguishes itself

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

How Leading Chemical Companies Protect Customer Data Online

Article | July 8, 2022

Cybersecurity concerns must be considered in order for the chemical sector to succeed with digital commerce; simply listing your products on an online store and crossing your fingers won't cut it. It is crucial to pick a spouse who is aware of these hazards and has a strong defense in place. It is evident that the sector has massive potential for online sales, but selling chemicals online is different from selling common consumer goods online. Who your consumers are and how you gather and maintain data about them raise severe security and privacy problems. Chemical company leaders have every right to be concerned about the privacy of their data, given that one cyber attack occurs every 11 seconds. However, they should still go online because there is too much business risk in not taking advantage of the digital opportunity. Deloitte estimates that the chemical sector alone sold over $27 billion worth of goods online in 2020. More than half (58%) of chemical purchasers reportedly stated that they would transfer providers if their demands, which include demands for a fantastic digital experience, were not delivered. The objective is to limit risk and create a secure digital sales environment rather than dismissing e-commerce due to cybersecurity issues. Setting up the appropriate IT infrastructure: Building for convenience and security is possible thanks to new IT technologies. Emphasis on confirming identification: Always be aware of who you are dealing with, regardless of whether they came through a digital or physical means. Offering simple (and safe) reorder alternatives to clients that have been verified. It's ideal for business owners in the chemical sector who want to test selling online but are concerned about data collecting, security, and privacy for my company and customers.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

Future-Proofing the Chemical Industry with Digitalization

Article | July 13, 2021

Over the next five to seven years, the chemical sector will place a greater emphasis on sustainability, and digitization will play a significant part in this. Reducing resource use, pollution, energy consumption, and waste are some of its main applications. Additionally, it will increase demand for a circular economy supported by IoT, AI, and other digital technologies. Some of the systems now in place or being used in the sector include autonomous solutions that enable lower energy usage, dispatching systems for effective logistics and strategies for sustainable power and fuel consumption. Chemical players making the switch to digital platforms have a chance to triumph if they move swiftly and update their operational models in accordance with a few common success characteristics. In fact, according to our study, making the correct decisions can increase total earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization by 3 percent or more (EBITDA). The Next Step of Operational Excellence The same level of transformation is available with digital technology for optimal performance, together with success-enabling measures. The same level of corporate participation and realignment will also be necessary for the effective implementation of digital technology. Finance and telecoms were early leaders in adopting digital technology faster than the chemical sector, which has just recently started to move in more significant numbers toward digitalization. A circular economy in the sector is also being enabled by the use and evaluation of digital technology. The "Right to Fix" movement is being driven by governments and legislators in Europe and the US, and small and medium-sized businesses in the industry are expected to invest in technology that makes it easier to repair electronic items with the least amount of waste. On a side note, by enabling the re-use of resources and products throughout the supply chain, digitalization with lean manufacturing (LM) would enable businesses to improve operational excellence and create value, thereby supporting the circular economy goal. Conclusion Given its extensive safety and regulatory requirements, the chemical sector has evolved slowly. However, as the global economy changes, some skills will become obsolete and others essential. The interconnectedness of people, processes, and technology, as well as the requirement for real-time insight at the levels closest to the action, are among the basic principles of Industry 4.0. These values have existed for some time and are an extension of our teams' current operational excellence initiatives. Digital transformation is not a technology endpoint but rather the following stage in the process and business evolution as the chemicals industry advances continuously.

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CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

Key Trends in the Digital Transformation of the Chemical Industry

Article | August 8, 2022

The chemical business is intricate, with numerous sub-sectors dealing with various challenges. Thus, there are some differences in the sector's main areas of digitalization. For instance, while specialty chemicals with smaller batches but larger profit margins are concerned with improving quality, large factories are concentrated on accelerating throughput speed. To be able to react to quick and repeated changes in demand, supply, and working circumstances, however, every plant must optimize output, reduce waste, improve safety and sustainability, and become more nimble. Therefore, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), artificial intelligence (AI), and cloud computing are expected to be the three most popular applications for digital transformation during the coming two years. Key Trends Production Optimization The first and most valuable use cases of digitalization in chemical plants center on production optimization through improved equipment performance, process automation, remote and predictive monitoring, and simplified maintenance. Chemical factories, which often provide basic chemicals for use as end products in other sectors, have a special responsibility to maintain consistently high product quality. However, doing so can be challenging given the significant variations in raw material supply and quality. In addition, as process engineers can change the mix on the fly in reaction to fluctuations in quality, feedstock, or ambient temperatures, better data and analytics enable finer and more frequent adjustments. Lowering Waste The main advantage of digitally transformed plants so far has been cost reduction. The price volatility of raw materials is a problem for the chemical production sector because customers naturally want constant low prices. Minimizing waste is critical since facilities must contend with rising energy costs. Analytics tools that monitor fluctuating raw material prices aid factories in negotiating the best deals with suppliers and preparing in advance for price spikes. The risk of oversupply is reduced since plants can prepare the proper quantities of various products thanks to more precise demand predictions. Sustainability, Compliance, and Safety The chemical industry is heavily regulated as a result of the quantity of hazardous chemicals and the number of end-use industries that rely on it. Businesses are adopting digital transformation to boost safety awareness, reduce emissions and dangerous flare incidents, and guarantee a transparent and accurate audit trail. Plants that quickly adopt digital solutions for remote monitoring, supply chain visibility, waste reduction, production optimization, raising their safety profile, and opening up new opportunities will profit from higher profits and increased revenue, whereas those that hesitate for too long risk failing in the long run.

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CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT

The Future of Supply Chain Management for Chemical Companies

Article | July 8, 2022

Individual consumers expect tailored products and services. Color, size, quantity, payment method, and delivery channel options abound. The chemical sector is also now following this suit of action. The global chemicals supply chain has grown steadily for three decades. Chemical businesses are improving their supply chain capabilities to handle complexity and meet client demands. This includes implementing advanced data-driven and cloud-based technologies that enable faster, more flexible, and tailored customer interactions. Areas of innovation for chemical companies Living Segmentation Living segmentation can help chemical businesses better serve clients and satisfy their expectations. This entails adapting supply chain capabilities to each customer's needs. Asset-light Network An asset-light network involves developing an ecosystem of partners to add capabilities and value to your supply chain beyond standard co-manufacturing, co-packing, and third-party or last-mile logistics providers. In addition, it should include technology partners that help chemical businesses innovate and be adaptable. Data and Applied Intelligence Improving speed, agility, and efficiency in global supply chains demands comprehensive visibility and the correct information. Data provides visibility and insights. The key to providing excellent customer service is gathering the appropriate data and using it strategically to get important insight. The industry generates a ton of data, which is excellent news. In response to last year's supply chain delays, corporations are building supply chains with geographically spread shipping/supplier choices. Real-time visibility and enhanced analytics can be used to track delays by providing revised ETAs and analyzing downstream implications. Data-driven insights can alert organizations of a delay almost immediately and help them acquire raw materials from another supplier to reduce the domino impact downstream. Chemical businesses must rethink their supply chains to implement living segmentation, asset-light networks, data, and AI.

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Spotlight

Dura Chemicals, Inc

Dura Chemical Corporation was founded in India in 1948 as a supplier of raw materials for the coatings, plastics, rubber, and cosmetics industries. In 1961, the company commenced production of additives for the paint, printing ink, and PVC industries. Over the next five decades, Dura emerged as a leader in the production of metal organics including metal driers, PVC heat stabilizers and additives for the coatings, UPR, polyurethane, lubrication, and fuel industries. In 2006, we acquired the North American metal carboxylate and anti-skinning business of a major supplier; this considerably broadened our production and sales footprint, adding warehouses and offices from Mexico to Canada. Today, Dura has research, development, and manufacturing plants in India, a lab and production arm in the USA, and supply capabilities worldwide. Since 1994, we have been doing business in the USA as Dura Chemicals Inc., based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Ultimately, Dura Chemicals distinguishes itself

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US, Canada outline plans to align hazcom standards

Chemical Watch | March 11, 2020

Regulators from the US and Canada have laid out plans to coordinate efforts on workplace hazard communication standards as the two countries implement updates to the UN's Globally Harmonized System of classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS). According to the US-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) 2019-20 workplan, released this week, the council expects to roll out joint guidance on the implementation of GHS and interpreting requirements for safety data sheets (SDSs) and communicating product hazards across the two jurisdictions. Another primary goal, highlighted in the RCC workplan, is to have "one label and one SDS" that is acceptable in both countries. US and Canadian regulators also will continue to work together to push for a common position on the GHS at future UN meetings and plan to hold a stakeholder meeting this summer.

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TheHill | November 25, 2019

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phys.org | March 20, 2018

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US, Canada outline plans to align hazcom standards

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Regulators from the US and Canada have laid out plans to coordinate efforts on workplace hazard communication standards as the two countries implement updates to the UN's Globally Harmonized System of classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS). According to the US-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) 2019-20 workplan, released this week, the council expects to roll out joint guidance on the implementation of GHS and interpreting requirements for safety data sheets (SDSs) and communicating product hazards across the two jurisdictions. Another primary goal, highlighted in the RCC workplan, is to have "one label and one SDS" that is acceptable in both countries. US and Canadian regulators also will continue to work together to push for a common position on the GHS at future UN meetings and plan to hold a stakeholder meeting this summer.

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Most Americans assume that the chemicals in the consumer products we buy, such as that long list of unpronounceable ingredients in your bathroom cleaner or laundry detergent, have been tested and found safe for people and the environment. The truth is, not so much. And Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is missing an important opportunity to make those products safer. For decades, efforts to ensure chemical safety were stymied by an ineffective regulatory regime: the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976, which regulated household and industrial compounds, was widely regarded as toothless. During my 20-plus year career at EPA, I served as a senior manager in the agency’s toxics program from 1987 to 1989. The weakness of the original TSCA was a key factor in my decision to leave that position.

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Tiny gels sop up intestinal toxins

phys.org | March 20, 2018

Bacterial infections that target the intestine can cause conditions that range from uncomfortable to deadly. While it's easy to blame the bacteria, it's actually the toxins the bacteria produce that trigger inflammation, diarrhea, fever and cramps. Treatment strategies typically include indiscriminate antibiotics that slaughter health-promoting gut bacteria along with disease-causing microbes. Researchers now report the development of a microgel scavenger that targets toxins instead of bacteria. The researchers will present their work today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS)."We want to develop a new therapy that is based on scavenging the toxins rather than killing both the good and bad bacteria," says Alexander Kuehne, Ph.D. "This way inflammation can be reduced while supporting the natural intestinal flora and holding the bad bacteria at bay."About three decades ago, Kuehne says, scientists developed a particle that used electronic charge to bind toxins in the intestine. It made it to the clinical testing stage, he says, but had too many non-specific targets for further development. This idea was the basis, though, for Kuehne's team's current project.

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