Clariant Targets Improved Chemical Catalysts

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Among the programmes Clariant has commercialized is a next generation catalyst for methanol-to-propylene (MTP). Its current zeolite-based catalyst has been around for more than 10 years. Clariant’s oxidation catalyst pilot reactor in Heufeld, Germany. Switzerland-based specialty chemicals company Clariant is developing “optimized, improved versions” of catalysts to produce olefins, methanol, and ammonia, said the head of its catalysts research and development (R&D) department. “There are several programmes on the way to develop new solutions based on feedstock availability,” said Marvin Estenfelder, head of R&D at Clariant’s Catalysis business area.These feedstocks range from natural gas liquids (NGLs) to coal to biomass, he added.

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