China aims to relocate 80% of toxic chemical producers after blast

| May 24, 2019

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China aims to relocate more than 80% of its hazardous chemical production capacity by the end of next year, state media reported on Friday, as it embarks on far-reaching reforms in the sector following a fatal explosion at a factory in March.Citing government officials speaking at a forum this week, the Xinhua News Agency-backed Economic Information Daily reported China will now make sure the bulk of its hazardous chemical production is located in specialised industrial parks, where dangers can be monitored and controlled more effectively.

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Gat Fertilizers

Gat fertilizers is reknown for it's advanced and unique fertilizer production technology, highly trained production and logistics team and professional sales and agronomical support team. Established in 1985, the company holds two manufacturing platform sites, Deshen Gat Israel, in the northern and southern parts of Israel, which fulfill national agricultural needs by supplying high quality products, agronomic support and after-sales service.

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Spotlight

Gat Fertilizers

Gat fertilizers is reknown for it's advanced and unique fertilizer production technology, highly trained production and logistics team and professional sales and agronomical support team. Established in 1985, the company holds two manufacturing platform sites, Deshen Gat Israel, in the northern and southern parts of Israel, which fulfill national agricultural needs by supplying high quality products, agronomic support and after-sales service.

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