Chemical used in plastic packaging may cause obesity: research

ROHINI KRISHNAMURTHY | February 8, 2017

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A new study claims that exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used to make plastics, even in small quantities, increases the risk of obesity in children. The synthetic chemical is widely used in food packaging like water bottles and cans. Alfonso Abizaid and his team of researchers from Carleton University say that BPA reduces children’s sensitivity to leptin—the satiety hormone which informs us when we are full. Hampered functioning of leptin can cause overeating and lead to obesity, the research finds. The latest study, published in journal Endocrinology, contradicts United States Food and Drug Administration’s (USFDA) stand on the controversial chemical. FDA says that exposure to BPA is not harmful if it is limited to 11 micrograms per person per day. Use of food packaging like bottled liquids or canned food, at exposure greater than 150 micrograms per person per day can be an indicator of carcinogenicity and is a cause for concern, FDA adds.

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National Petrochemical Industrial Company

The National Petrochemical Industrial Co. NATPET has built a 400,000 MT/Year polypropylene plant in Yanbu Industrial City on the west coast of Saudi Arabia. This Plant is producing a wide range of polypropylene product mix of (Homopolymers, Random & Heterophasic Copolymers) that is suitable for a wide variety of applications.

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