Chemical Security: Unfinished Business in Washington is Risky Business

| November 26, 2018

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There are many things Congress must address before it is set to adjourn but none can be more urgent than passing legislation to preserve one of the nation’s most important anti-terrorism programs, the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS). Chemistry is the lifeblood of our economy — directly touching 96 percent of all manufactured goods. Securing and maintaining the economic viability of this critical part of our infrastructure is vital to U.S. prosperity and our national security.

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OTHER ARTICLES

Global polyolefins for the rest of 2021: supply to lengthen as demand muddle continues

Article | May 2, 2021

SOMEHOW, despite the still very serious container freight shortages that have limited imports, buying sentiment seems to have weakened in the European polyolefins market, according to my outstanding ICIS colleague, Linda Naylor.

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Boom in petrochemicals demand guaranteed but we must grow sustainably

Article | June 3, 2021

ONE OF THE GREATEST achievements of the last 30 years has been the fall in the number of people living in extreme poverty.In 1999, 1.9bn of the world’s population were living on less than $1.90, the Word Bank’s definition of extreme poverty. Despite setbacks caused by the pandemic, this had fallen to 698m by October 2020. Income levels alone are not enough to escape the life-threatening agony of extreme poverty. There is no point in having money if the essential goods and services to spend your money on are not available. Critical to poverty alleviation has been sufficient supply of all the things that people in the rich world take for granted. The raw materials to make the vast majority of manufactured goods include petrochemicals and polymers. Nearly all the major manufacturing chains would not have been able to function without petrochemicals. Think of medical equipment, syringes, blood bags, hospital gowns, face masks, pill bottles and medicine blister packs. None of the above could have been produced without petrochemicals. As people emerged out of extreme poverty and as economies became wealthier, modern-day medical services became more widely available.

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6 APPLICATIONS OF MACHINE LEARNING IN OIL AND GAS

Article | March 4, 2020

The issue of environmental sustainability is a major concern for governments and players from the oil and gas industry worldwide. The negative impacts as a result of activities carried out by oil and gas companies have been a major tool not only for the livelihood and health of people but more so to the environment, such as pollution. The risk of environmental pollution, hazards and severity can be and will be reduced with the use of machine learning and deep learning in the years to come. There has been an amazing application in chemical engineering, process safety, process control tuning, advanced dynamic and process optimization. We can see that the Oil and Gas industry when we talk about software especially machine learning solutions didn’t have any innovation in the last 15 years.

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Demographics are reshaping petrochemicals trade flows, investment patterns and demand

Article | May 23, 2021

TEN YEARS AGO, fellowblogger Paul Hodgesand Ifirst highlighted the leading rolethat changing demographics would play in reshaping petrochemicals supply and demand. We have been emphasising the importance of demographics ever since. Demographics have, of course, always been a critical shaper of economies throughout human history. But during the last 70 years, there have been such major changes in demographics that the study of demographics must be at the very heart of your company’s strategy. The Babyboomer generation in the West led to a surge in demand as the rapid increase in babies born in the 1950s and early 1960s joined the workforce from the 1970s onwards. This helps explain high levels of inflation during that decade because too much demand was chasing too little supply. Another driver of inflation was the Middle East embargos against oil exports to the West because of the West’s support for Israel. Then came the 1990s and first the integration of Eastern Europe into the global economy. This helped dampen inflationary pressures because of the plentiful supply of workers in the east willing to work for low wages in export-focused factories. This reduced the cost of finished goods in the West. Next came Deng Xiaoping’s critically important“southern tour”in the early 1990s and China’s gradual integration into the global economy. China increasingly leveraged its very youthful population to again make cheap goods to export to the West. Hundreds of millions of young people were willing to migrate from the countryside to China’s coastal cities to work in export-focused manufacturing plants. The world began to talk about the “China price” and how it was further depressing global inflation.

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Stahl

At Stahl we know that there are endless possibilities everywhere. For each day, we are challenged to help our partners with the best possible solutions that contribute to create a better future for our partners, our own people and our environment.

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