CHEMICAL PROCESSING 101: AGGLOMERATING

JOSH BASINGER | November 16, 2017

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Agglomeration is the process of forming powdered and particle-based materials into a larger mass. Agglomerates are loosely held together by physical and chemical forces, depending on the method or process used for adhesion. This can be especially useful when it comes to converting raw materials into more useful forms, transform waste material into a marketable product, or compile hard-to-control materials into a more manageable form. While agglomeration is often a chemical process that is sought out, it can occasionally be an unwanted chemical reaction to other factors i.e. powder products caking or lumping together, or individual sheets of agglomerates sticking to one another in shipping.

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