Chemical Plant | Process Animation (Petrochemical)

| March 11, 2016

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This Technical Animation is also a Product Animation by using a Petrochemical Environment. The Prilling Tower is placed in a Petrochemical environment. The Petrochemical proces of the Plant is visualised with arrows. The tempeture of the proces is visualised with different colors. The Kreber Prilling Tower was imported as 3D CAD model.

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King Elong Co.

King Elong (KEL) is a medium-sized company specializing in trading agricultural materials. “Elong” branded products are considered to be of prominent quality with the technical support from international and local experts. KEL products are distributed widely in Vietnam and exported to China, the Philippines, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, India, Northern Ireland, Middle East and South America via a network of dealers. Our main products are chemical for pesticides, bio-pesticides and pharma.

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Spotlight

King Elong Co.

King Elong (KEL) is a medium-sized company specializing in trading agricultural materials. “Elong” branded products are considered to be of prominent quality with the technical support from international and local experts. KEL products are distributed widely in Vietnam and exported to China, the Philippines, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, India, Northern Ireland, Middle East and South America via a network of dealers. Our main products are chemical for pesticides, bio-pesticides and pharma.

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