CANADA’S CHEMICALS AND PLASTICS SECTOR

N/A | May 26, 2017

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Canada’s chemicals and plastics production was valued at more than $73 billion,1 with exports totalling nearly $40 billion in 2013,2 and contributed $19.2 billion to Canadian GDP in 2013.3 The industry is poised for continued growth Canada’s chemical sector alone is forecast to increase by 27 percent by 2020, a higher rate than in the U.S. and Western Europe.

Spotlight

Scharlab,S.L.

Headquartered in Barcelona (Spain), Scharlab has experienced an outstanding growth in the last few decades. This has led us to establish subsidiaries in 5 countries and enabled us to develop a presence worldwide through a distribution network that covers over 100 countries. The company was founded in 1949 in Barcelona under the name of F.E.R.O.S.A. as a company to synthesise organic compounds. In 1954 this company was bought over by Paul Scharlau, a second generation German in Spain. He then came to an agreement with the German company Dr. Theodor Schuchardt to distribute their laboratory chemicals and to manufacture in Spain under licence. In 1970, Schuchardt, was sold to Merck-Darmstadt and FEROSA had no alternative but to start selling chemicals under a different name and thus the Scharlau brand was born in 1971. Thousands of purification processes were consequently perfected to offer reagents of exceptional purity.

OTHER ARTICLES

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Spotlight

Scharlab,S.L.

Headquartered in Barcelona (Spain), Scharlab has experienced an outstanding growth in the last few decades. This has led us to establish subsidiaries in 5 countries and enabled us to develop a presence worldwide through a distribution network that covers over 100 countries. The company was founded in 1949 in Barcelona under the name of F.E.R.O.S.A. as a company to synthesise organic compounds. In 1954 this company was bought over by Paul Scharlau, a second generation German in Spain. He then came to an agreement with the German company Dr. Theodor Schuchardt to distribute their laboratory chemicals and to manufacture in Spain under licence. In 1970, Schuchardt, was sold to Merck-Darmstadt and FEROSA had no alternative but to start selling chemicals under a different name and thus the Scharlau brand was born in 1971. Thousands of purification processes were consequently perfected to offer reagents of exceptional purity.

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