Brenntag signs agreement to acquire industrial and specialty chemicals distributor Quimisa

| October 9, 2019

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Brenntag has signed an agreement to acquire Quimisa SA including its logistics subsidiary Quimilog. The company headquartered in Brusque, Brazil, has a strong market position in providing industrial and specialty chemicals to regional and international clients in Southern Brazil. The product portfolio includes industrial chemicals such as caustic soda and hydrogen peroxide as well as a wide range of specialty chemicals like textile auxiliaries, dyes, and polymers. Products are supplied to the textile, household products, food and beverage and paper industries with a strong logistics and customer service model.

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Huntsman Corporation

Huntsman Corporation is a publicly traded global manufacturer and marketer of differentiated chemicals with 2015 revenues of approximately $10 billion. Our chemical products number in the thousands and are sold worldwide to manufacturers serving a broad and diverse range of consumer and industrial end markets. We operate more than 100 manufacturing and R&D facilities in approximately 30 countries and employ approximately 15,000 associates within our 5 distinct business divisions.

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Spotlight

Huntsman Corporation

Huntsman Corporation is a publicly traded global manufacturer and marketer of differentiated chemicals with 2015 revenues of approximately $10 billion. Our chemical products number in the thousands and are sold worldwide to manufacturers serving a broad and diverse range of consumer and industrial end markets. We operate more than 100 manufacturing and R&D facilities in approximately 30 countries and employ approximately 15,000 associates within our 5 distinct business divisions.

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