Banned chemicals persist in deep ocean

| February 14, 2017

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Chemicals banned in the 1970s have been found in the deepest reaches of the Pacific Ocean, a new study shows. Scientists were surprised by the relatively high concentrations of pollutants like PCBs and PBDEs in deep sea ecosystems. Used widely during much of the 20th Century, these chemicals were later found to be toxic and to build up in the environment. The results are published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

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OTHER ARTICLES

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Article | March 10, 2020

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Article | February 20, 2020

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DyStar

DyStar Group is a solution provider, offering customers across the globe a complete range of colorants, auxiliaries, and services. The DyStar Group has offices, competence centers, agencies, and production plants in over 50 countries to ensure the availability of expertise in all important markets.

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