Asking questions after an incident involving hazardous chemicals

| April 29, 2019

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Incidents involving hazardous chemicals open up a whole range of questions: what really happened? Why? Who? How? This blog is all about asking questions — not just the questions to ask, but better ways to ask them. Use this blog as you create your own checklist of questions to use during your HAZCHEM incident investigation. The scene of an incident involving hazardous chemicals may still contain spilled fuel, smoke, fumes, dusts, and other chemical residues. Keeping people safe and securing the incident site should always be prioritised over asking questions and beginning the investigation.

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Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Scripps Institution of Oceanography is one of the oldest, largest, and most important centers for ocean and earth science research, education, and public service in the world. Research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography encompasses physical, chemical, biological, geological, and geophysical studies of the oceans and earth.

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Spotlight

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Scripps Institution of Oceanography is one of the oldest, largest, and most important centers for ocean and earth science research, education, and public service in the world. Research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography encompasses physical, chemical, biological, geological, and geophysical studies of the oceans and earth.

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