Artificial dog noses make explosives detectors more effective

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Matthew Staymates: It’s all about what we call sampling. Any chemical detection system can be broken down into two basic components: the sampling component (how you collect the sample) and the analyzer (how you chemically analyze the sample). The way the dog samples for odors is one reason it is an amazing chemical detection system. The geometry of the nose and nostrils, coupled with the directionality of air when the dog exhales, allows the dog to “reach out” and grab odors from fairly large distances. We call this the “aerodynamic reach” for vapor sampling. Most commercially available chemical vapor detectors don’t work this way – they simply inhale air at a continuous rate, which limits their aerodynamic reach.

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Epizyme

Epizyme, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to rewriting treatment for cancer and other serious diseases through novel epigenetic medicines. Epizyme is broadly developing its lead product candidate, tazemetostat, a first-in-class EZH2 inhibitor, with studies underway in both solid tumors and hematological malignancies, as a monotherapy and combination therapy in relapsed and front-line disease. The company is also developing a novel G9a program with its next development candidate, EZM8266, which is targeting sickle cell disease. By focusing on the genetic drivers of disease, Epizyme's science seeks to match targeted medicines with patients who need them.

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Pandemic’s third wave seems unlikely to damage global petrochemicals demand

Article | July 22, 2021

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What Are Fine Chemicals?

Article | July 22, 2021

The initial versions of drugs were produced by extracting substances from natural herbs and other plants. As understanding and technology in chemistry continued to grow, scientists figured out to isolate and extract a lot more individual compounds from raw materials. The complicated processes that produce these simple, pure substances form the field of fine chemistry. The chemical industry is separated into branches, with fine chemicals serving as the smallest segment of them. Its companions are commodities and specialty chemicals. Commodity chemicals are those that are mass-produced on a big scale to supply global markets. They include general compounds that are the same from supplier to supplier. Specialty chemicals usually are sold as brand name products and are advertised for their distinct qualities and their abilities to carry out functions that other chemicals cannot. They are composed of one or more fine chemicals.

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What's the Most Toxic Chemical?

Article | July 22, 2021

People say America doesn’t make things anymore. But what about toxic chemicals? We make so many of those, we throw half of them in rivers, for free. The problem is, it can be hard to get a handle on which of those chemicals are extremely toxic and which of them are merely somewhat toxic. If one or another shows up in a scan of your stomach, should you freak out or just be grateful it wasn’t something worse? For this week’s Giz Asks, we reached out to a number of experts to find out what the most toxic chemical is.

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Coronavirus and the petrochemicals industry

Article | July 22, 2021

The coronavirus outbreak has touched virtually every aspect of modern life. For the petrochemicals industry, the landscape is shifting at an alarming pace. Only one thing seems certain: the coming decade will be shaped by this crisis. Consumer behaviour, investment decisions, the corporate landscape and even the path of globalisation will be influenced by its effects. Two immediate major shockwaves are linked to economic activity and feedstock pricing. The global economy is heading for recession. Our thinking has moved from an economic slowdown to a deep global recession, with the potential for a slow recovery. This has dramatic implications for the industry.

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Spotlight

Epizyme

Epizyme, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to rewriting treatment for cancer and other serious diseases through novel epigenetic medicines. Epizyme is broadly developing its lead product candidate, tazemetostat, a first-in-class EZH2 inhibitor, with studies underway in both solid tumors and hematological malignancies, as a monotherapy and combination therapy in relapsed and front-line disease. The company is also developing a novel G9a program with its next development candidate, EZM8266, which is targeting sickle cell disease. By focusing on the genetic drivers of disease, Epizyme's science seeks to match targeted medicines with patients who need them.

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