ACHIEVE SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH CHEMICALS

| September 12, 2017

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Most research labs find themselves in the business of acquiring and managing research chemicals. It’s not their mission, and it’s not generally considered a value-add. No research lab ever made a major discovery solely by acquiring and managing chemicals well, and no research enterprise has ever leveraged a unique approach to chemical acquisition and management for a distinctive competitive advantage. It’s just the cost of doing business. Does that mean all research chemical management is equal, or that chemical acquisition and management can’t add value for research organizations? Definitely not. Labs managing chemicals poorly expose their organizations to higher acquisition, carrying, and disposal costs; regulatory and safety risks; lost productivity; and unwanted environmental and societal impacts.

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Houghton International

Since 1865, Houghton International Inc. has been serving the metalworking, automotive, and steel industries, along with a variety of other markets including the offshore oil exploration and production industry, with the development and production of specialty chemicals, oils and lubricants. Headquartered in Valley Forge, Pa., Houghton maintains manufacturing and research facilities throughout the world. Houghton International continues its focus to expand its customer service operations and grow its worldwide facilities.

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Spotlight

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Since 1865, Houghton International Inc. has been serving the metalworking, automotive, and steel industries, along with a variety of other markets including the offshore oil exploration and production industry, with the development and production of specialty chemicals, oils and lubricants. Headquartered in Valley Forge, Pa., Houghton maintains manufacturing and research facilities throughout the world. Houghton International continues its focus to expand its customer service operations and grow its worldwide facilities.

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