A quick introduction to engineering controls for hazardous chemicals

WALTER INGLES | January 25, 2019

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The Hierarchy of Controls is a systemized approach to identifying and implementing chemical hazard controls. This blog discusses engineering controls and how they fit into the overall hazard control hierarchy (we’ll also look at what can cause them to fail). Like all hazard control measures, engineering controls should be selected after careful analysis of the workplace, the job tasks being undertaken, as well as the physical and health hazards presented by the chemicals.

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Pardis Petrochemical Complex

PARDIS Petrochemical Company; a producer and supplier of Urea/Ammonia, is the owner of the greatest complex of producing Urea and Ammonia in the Middle East and its plant is one of the greatest producing plants of such products in the world.

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IT FEELS LIKE several lifetimes ago. If you recall, way back in November-December 2019 Asian variable cost integrated naphtha-based polyethylene (PE) margins turned negative because of the increase in US capacity. Then in January the following year, deep Asian and Middle East operating rate cuts returned some order to the market. Then, bang, as we all know, the pandemic arrived and turned everything on its head. The pandemic has, in my view, accentuated trends that were already well underway. I believe this means that the supply-driven downturn that started in late 2019 will not return.Long before coronavirus upended everyone’s lives, PE demand was becoming increasingly divorced from GDP growth because of the shifting nature of end-use demand. Booming internet sales was, I believe, a major factor behind the split between the growth of the overall economies in the developed world plus China and PE demand.The average product bought online is dropped 17 times because of the large number of people involved in the logistics chain, according to Forbes. This had led to a surge in demand for protective packaging made not from PE and other polymers such as polypropylene, expandable polystyrene and PET films (I will look at their demand growth prospects in later posts).Despite sustainability pressures, the scale of demand for stuff bought online translated to a lot more consumption of virgin polymers.

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Spotlight

Pardis Petrochemical Complex

PARDIS Petrochemical Company; a producer and supplier of Urea/Ammonia, is the owner of the greatest complex of producing Urea and Ammonia in the Middle East and its plant is one of the greatest producing plants of such products in the world.

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