4 places never to put your flammable liquid storage cabinet

| July 25, 2019

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Ever bought sunscreen then forgotten to take it to the beach? Ever driven the car without a seatbelt? Just the same as these everyday examples, your high-tech and sophisticated flammable liquid storage cabinet will be almost as useless if you don’t install it properly. Here’s a quick blog which outlines 4 places never to put an indoor safety cabinet that is designed for the storage of Class 3 Flammable Liquids. Each point below is an essential requirement of AS1940:2017 –The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids. Class 3 Flammable liquids can ignite at normal room temperature and are capable of exploding at the right concentration levels. The volatility of these chemicals mean they don’t need a naked flame to ignite... heat or just a spark will do. Your flammable liquids cabinet should never be installed within 3 metres of an ignition source. And this works the other way round too — you should never bring an ignition source within 3 metres of your flammable liquids cabinet.

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