10 ways to improve your bio-based chemical plant

| September 13, 2019

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Bio-based chemicals production is a rapidly growing field in the processing industry. As with most new technologies, there are both great opportunities and many pitfalls. To be successful you first need to make the process work in a lab environment and then scale up to commercial production and make the process financially viable. The challenges you face in these two stages are very different, and to be profitable you need to overcome all of them. To make the most of your investments it is essential to partner up with an experienced equipment supplier that helps you find the optimum solutions for your plant.

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GVK BIO

Established in 2001, GVK BIO is one of the largest Discovery CRO with operations in US and India. At GVK BIO, we blend science with people and technology to help accelerate Drug Discovery and Development for more than 400+ clients globally across small and large molecule platforms.

OTHER ARTICLES

Why chemical characterization is the best way to assess patient risk

Article | February 11, 2020

Everyone is very familiar with the phrase when buying a house: All that really matters are three things - location, location, and location. This same principle applies to extractables and leachables chemistry analysis – the three things that truly matter are identification, identification, and identification. The greatest growth in the past ten years in demonstrating the safety of medical devices and container closure systems for drugs has been using analytical chemistry to determine what chemicals can leach from the device and what the patient is exposed to during its intended use.

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Resin and Polymeric Binders for Inks

Article | May 19, 2021

The market size for polymeric and resin binders in the global printing ink marketwas estimated to be over 1,200,000 MT in 2020, with a CAGR of about five percent. A major driver of this growth comes from the packaging industry, due to increases in consumer spending and online shopping, as well as demand for processed and packaged foods and beverages. In addition, increased use of water-based inks is promoting market growth, off-setting environmental and health concerns regarding solvent-based inks in addition to strict environmental protection policies. Water-based inks are projected to overtake solvent-based inks due to environmental regulations, the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the pressroom, and improvements in overall print quality. Ink formulations are complex mixtures, consisting of four basic component classes: pigments, polymeric binder resins, solvents or an aqueous dispersant media, and additives, such as surfactants, waxes, and rheology modifiers that enhance print quality. The purpose of the resin binder is to disperse and carry the ink pigment to the substrate, stabilize the pigment and additives dispersion to prevent settling, and provide print properties such as ink transfer behavior, setting, and drying characteristics. The binder also contributes surface appearance and gloss, strength and flexibility, chemical and solvent resistance, and also rub resistance. Ink binders can be categorized into the following polymer and resin types: acrylics, polyurethanes, polyamides, modified resins, hydrocarbon resins, and modified cellulosics.

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Coronavirus and the petrochemicals industry

Article | April 2, 2020

The coronavirus outbreak has touched virtually every aspect of modern life. For the petrochemicals industry, the landscape is shifting at an alarming pace. Only one thing seems certain: the coming decade will be shaped by this crisis. Consumer behaviour, investment decisions, the corporate landscape and even the path of globalisation will be influenced by its effects. Two immediate major shockwaves are linked to economic activity and feedstock pricing. The global economy is heading for recession. Our thinking has moved from an economic slowdown to a deep global recession, with the potential for a slow recovery. This has dramatic implications for the industry.

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We can solve the plastic waste crisis but we don’t have much time

Article | May 27, 2021

IN 2015, a global agreement was reached that 8m tonnes a year of plastic waste entering the oceans was unacceptable, according to this September 2020 article in The Conversation. This was the amount of plastic that was estimated to have ended up in the oceans in 2010. “Several international platforms emerged to address the crisis, including Our Ocean, the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the G7 Ocean Plastic Charter, among others,” continued the article. But in 2020, an estimated 24m-34m tonnes of plastic waste was forecast to enter our lakes, rivers and oceans. This could reach as much as 90m tonnes in 2030 if the current trajectory continued, said The Conversation. This is the type of information out there, free to view on the internet and accessible via a very quick Google search, representing a major challenges for our industry. I cannot of course verify the numbers. But they are out there. Also out there is a May 2019 article by the World Economic Forum (WEF), which provided a good summary of research into what experts believed was the scale of the waste problem in the developing world.

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Spotlight

GVK BIO

Established in 2001, GVK BIO is one of the largest Discovery CRO with operations in US and India. At GVK BIO, we blend science with people and technology to help accelerate Drug Discovery and Development for more than 400+ clients globally across small and large molecule platforms.

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